Ruben Santiago-Hudson will star in his one-man show 'Lackawanna Blues.' (Photo: Jim Spellman/Getty Images)

Manhattan Theatre Club is planning to bring back live theater productions in fall 2021. 

The theater company aims to kick off their season this fall with the Broadway premiere of the one-person show, “Lackawanna Blues,” written, starring and directed by Ruben Santiago-Hudson. “How I Learned to Drive,” which was originally scheduled to open in April 2020, will now return to the Samuel J. Friedman Theater in spring 2022. 

Off-Broadway, the Manhattan Theatre Club announced the world premiere of “Morning Sun,” written by Simon Stephens and directed by Lila Neugebauer. The play, which is scheduled to run this fall at New York City Center’s Stage I, will star Edie Falco, Blair Brown and Marin Ireland. 

As part of its 2021-2022 Off-Broadway season, Manhattan Theatre Club will also stage the American premiere of “Golden Shield,” written by Anchuli Felicia King and directed by Danya Taymor. 

Exact dates for these productions, as well as the announcement of two additional productions, will be revealed at a later date. 

“With hopes high that we will be able to return to live theatre, we have created a season of diverse and exciting Broadway and off-Broadway Premieres and we are honored to be working with the very best of New York’s brilliant artistic community. Our colleagues are anticipating with joy being back in our rehearsal rooms and back on our stages, playing to houses filled with devoted theatregoers,” Lynne Meadow, artistic director of Manhattan Theatre Club, said in a press release. 

These join several other productions aiming to return to the stages in fall 2021, including “American Utopia,” “MJ” and “Flying Over Sunset.”

“How I Learned to Drive,” written by Paula Vogel and directed by Mark Brokaw, will retain its previously announced cast members of Mary-Louise Parker, David Morse, Johanna Day, Alyssa May Gold and Chris Myers. 

“Lackawanna Blues,” which tells the true story of Santiago-Hudson’s upbringing in Western New York, debuted Off-Broadway in 2001 and was later made into a television film adaptation.